Monday, May 25, 2009

Indian Borage



My friend, Rox, has given me an Indian Borage (she mistakenly called it "Apple Mint) stem cut to grow my own. Like Rox, many has mistaken the Indian Borage plant with mint as it smells like one, but with stronger smell. The leaf also look similar to mint, only that it's bigger and have some fine hair on it.

On Saturday, I can feel a sore throat ws coming down on me. My friends and I had a feast of 'keropok lekor' the night before at our cell group meeting. I remembered Rox told me that the Indian Borage works wonders as remedy for cough and sore throat. Though I am afraid of taking herbs raw (especially bitter ones), I put a piece of freshly plucked Indian Borage leaf into my mouth and chew on it.

The minty smell was strong, then there was a tinge of bitterness, followed by a sweet flavour at the end of the throat as the leaf was swallowed. Miraculously, the symptom of sore throat vanished! You can give the Indian Borage a try too if you have a sore throat and cough.



It is said that Indian Borage can be used for culinary purpose too. However, I have not find out in what dishes can it be used yet.

I hope to propagate more Indian Borage and share it with my friends. I just gave one to my neighbour, Letchumi and she was so glad to receive it. I hope I could spread more joy through my garden to friends and neighbours.


Growing the Indian Borage at Home
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Marlene_OntheWall shared this information on how to grow Indian Borage:

The easiest way to propagate the Indian Borage is to use stem cuttings (Seeds can also be used, where available).

Cut a length of the central stem. Each segment should be approximately 5-8 inches and have several nodes. Remove the leaves from the bottom two to three nodes and insert into the soil.

It's important to make sure your pot has good drainage. Ideally, the soil should be moist. Take care not to overwater as this plant does not like wet conditions.

If you live in the tropical or subtropical areas, place the plant in semi-shade. If the amount of sun is right, the leaves should be a nice jade-green. If it is getting too much sun, the leaves turn yellow and start curling; not enough sun, and the leaves turn a dark shade of green.

In cooler regions, the plant can be placed in full sun. As it is susceptible to frost, you may want to grow it in a pot which can be moved indoors or to more sheltered areas during winter.

8 comments:

Stephanie said...

Hi JC, wow this mint can relieve sore throat... amazing! Yah, looking forward to see your plumeria :-) TQ for your recommendation. Fyi, the nurseries at along Jalan Subang have a lot to offer. However the price cannot be compared with the USJ1 nursery that you have mentioned.

Bangchik and Kakdah said...

I will try when needed... first I got to grow one.

islandgal246 said...

we call this big leaf thyme, it is also called oregano. It is great in an Italian meat sauce and on fish. It is very strong so use it carefully to your taste. Grows very easily, and there is a variegated one as well.

zill said...

Hi where can I buy Indian Borage palnt or seeds please?

Tezi said...

http://www.sailusfood.com/2010/06/19/vaamu-aaku-bajji-ajwain-patta-fresh-carom-leaves-ke-pakode/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+sailusfood/iqzM+(Sailu's+Indian+Food+%26+Andhra+Recipes)

p3chandan said...

I was told it was called Indian Oregano n recently was given a cutting by my cousin.I love the smell which is stronger than mint. Thank you for the info on its medicinal value of relieving sore throat

Tarino said...

Indian Borage can be boiled to make soup. The soup is very bitter, but it supposedly has medicinal properties.

J.C. said...

Thanks Tarino for sharing this info. The flavour of the Indian Borage can be overpowering. I will have 2nd thought to attempt adding them into my soup. Now that you tell me it has a bitter taste, I am sure to keep it away from any meal that I cook! Ha ha ha...

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