Saturday, July 31, 2010

Adenium Given A Haircut

I felt bad about indirectly killing the caterpillar 'Ah Pui' that I kept as captive in order to watch its metamorphosis process. Since then, I stopped removing caterpillars that visit my garden. Call that generosity.....or guilt-ridden! Ha ha...
Last month, I had another caterpillars visit to my Adenium plant. They ate the leaves voraciously and I was left with rather ugly plants. So I trimmed all the leaves and trunks off.

In one and a half month, this is how it looks!!! Beautiful, right? With buds appearing too!
Of course lotsa organic fertilizer helped in the quick growth. I have also uprooted the plant to reveal its caudex (root). Regular uprooting of Adenium will encourage the caudex to grow bigger. In addition, I have bought some sand and add them to my soil mixture. In the previous re-potting exercise, I have added too much of peat soil. As the peat soil retains water, during continuous raining, I found some root rot. Adenium needs soil that drains well. This is also another reason why I uproot the plant, i.e. to check on the root and change the soil mix.
When my friend, Rox, who also loves growing Adenium told me that regular trimming of Adenium would make the plant looks better. I had my hesitation and doubts as it takes some time for the plant to grow, so why trim them off? After my first trimming, I never stop doing it on a regular basis! Read more about Trimming Adenium here.


I didn't take any photo of the above Adenium after its haircut. It certainly has a better styled hairdo now. Trust me!



Due to poor drainage soil, the root of this Adenium rot too! Fortunately I discovered it early and was able to salvage the plant. One of the signs of the root rot was leaves turning yellow and began to drop off.

With new leaves and buds growing, it looks much healthier. Adenium feeds on fertilizer voraciously. Another tips from Rox, she feeds her Adenium with chicken dung and they bloom non-stop. I blogged about her garden and Adenium here. Check out photos of her Adenium blooms and drool!! Ha ha...

Another lush Adenium growing after being turned bald last month!

14 comments:

antigonum cajan said...

I am not fond of mutilation of any tree, plant, bush.

What is the purpose?

Would you like your toes dismembered, to have ten in their place?

Bangchik said...

Pruning allows new growth. That should be an important element in container gardening. Otherwise we have to be satisfied with plants with too many weak and dying branches. Adenium seems to love this treatment.
~bangchik

p3chandan said...

Im going to start trimming my adenium now thanks for the tips!

國林維 said...

快樂,是享受工作過程的結果..................................................

Autumn Belle said...

Your adenium looks good, especially the buttress of the tree which is beautifully shaped now. I have only 1 adenium plant and the thought of repotting always gives me the nerves. I guess this is a step I have to learn to perfect.

Malar said...

Your collection of Adeniums look really pretty! An exotic looking Adenium!

James Missier said...

Did you in anyway tried propagated with any of the pruned ones?
I had tried with one and it worked but not all will survive.

J.C. said...

Hi James,

I did propagate Adenium fromt he cut stems. However, it's difficult to get big caudex (root) from cut stem. To get Adenium with big caudex, it would require propagation from seed. Would you be keen to get some seeds to try? My Adenium has grown seed pod. If you want some seed, I can mail them to you. Just e-mail me your address. But hope you don't mind to wait for some time for the pod to grow and burst.

Stephanie said...

The last time I pruned my little adenium... it nearly rotted as well. Fortunately I discover fast also... it was a grafted plant so... I was really lucky that the plant managed to bounce back he he...

Btw, I don't think you can get a caudex using the stem to grow.

James, you better mail JC your address! The fresher/newer the seed, the better chance it will germinate. The growth rate is not so slow.

RainGardener said...

Hi JC, what a great blog you have - very informative. Your vegies are looking good. I've been reading about your Adenium and really enjoyed that - I've never heard of them before so found it quite interesting. It has such a big stock (?) like Bonsai. I watched your slide show too and saw all of the beautiful flowers you have. WoW!
Thanks for visiting my place - I love the company!

sushmita said...

hii JC,
Im sushmita from india. im still marvelling at ur adeniums really beautiful.
ive recently got an adenium plant from a local nursery, i just plainly repotted it with the same soil didnt check for root rot. looking at ur plants im wondering if i should do that. also im really scared to prune d branches or pinch d leaves, it would'nt kill my plant would it? would mixing gravel improve water drainage?
ur blog is d best on adeniums, keep up d good work.

J.C. said...

Hi Sushmita,

Sorry that I have not been checking my blog recently and thus only read your comment now.

Adenium flourish in good drainage soil. Adding gravel is ok. In fact I put some gravel on the top of the soil to prevent weeds from growing. I added some river sand (those used for construction) in my mixture of black soil and compost. It's ok to prune Adenium regularly. In fact when the branches become straggly, it would be better to prune the branches and let new shoots grow. Add fertilizers after you have pruned, and in no time you will see new shoots and blooms all around the plant.

sushmita said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
sushmita said...

hey JC,
i would like to very happily tell u that my adenium plant is budding with red buds. i was so concerned if they will bud ever so i am relieved. i'll post the pics later. can i artificially pollinate them by any chance???

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